Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Sønderhå church / Sønderhå kirke, Hassing herred, Thisted amt




The high-placed church in Sønderhå is surrounded by old boulder-dikes . It has a Romanesque choir and nave in carved granite ashlars and a late medieval western tower and a newer porch to the north. In the choir are traces of original windows, among those also a circular leprosy-window 97 cm above the plinth on the south side. The south door is bricked-up, but the north door is still in use. The tower, built ab. 1500, probably had a Romanesque predecessor, since the bottom sections are in Romanesque ashlars while the upper sections are yellow monk bricks.

Inside the church are beamed ceilings, and the Romanesque choir arch is preserved with profiled kragsten. The tower room opens to the nave in a point arched archade, and it got a cross-vault in 1928. Upon the bricked communion table is a triptychon, carved ab. 1500 with paintings from 1708. The Romanesque granite font has a south German baptismal basin from ab. 1575. The pulpit is contemporary to the altar piece and has an inscription: "1589 er denne prædikestol indsat. 1711 er denne prædikestol stafferet ." (the pulpit was placed there in 1589 and was painted in 1711 by Thøger Thrane). A lectern from the 1600s with a painted year 1755 is now placed upon the communion table. A priest stool with a sounding board from the 1700s is now in the choir. The pews are from the 1600s.

Kovstrup belonged earlier to a nobility family Munk. In 1389 Christen Munk gave his farm Østergård in Sønderhå to the priest office. In 1455 his son's son is mentioned, Christen Munk in Kovstrup, in 1474 his wife fru Marine in K. and his brother-in-law Peder Jensen in K. in 1485-091. Christen Munk's son of the same name owned (a part of) K., but also his siblings wrote themselves to K., Benedicte Munk in 1481, Laurids M. in 1498 and Jep M. 1504-15.


temporary post will be finished later.

1 comment:

Mary Lundeen said...

One of my ancestors was from Sogard Manor, Harring, Hassing Herred in the 1600's. Do you know anything about this manor?